33 Days in the Wilderness Day 22

We are up early and there is no time for even a swim in the beautiful pool or to look at the beach before we leave.

We go back down towards Cairns to catch the train which goes through the mountain and above the rainforest and hope the track is safe after the Sunday landslide.

It is extremely hot and very sunny.  We wear our large brimmed hats and lots of sun tan lotion.  Maureen says, I don’t know whether we are putting this sun tan lotion on to prevent sun burn or to keep us from rusting up.”

We stop at the falls for photographs and then travel north on the train to Atherton where we have a whole hour’s break for lunch.  At Atherton Post Office I post the computer disc and a photo of me with Buddy to John so he can remember what I look like.

We go on to more falls and people from another trip go into the water and swim beneath the waterfall.  The torrent of water is so heavy we think they are mad.

We go to a museum shop past Innisfall which has been cut off through flood waters for a couple of days.  We see a young man turning wood and he makes a spinning top (peerie).  He has Scottish ancestry and he is really I interested to learn how I used a peerie as a chid in a Scottish village. I tell him how we put a nail in the bottom to lengthen the life of the peerie and how we chalked it with different coloured horizontal stripes so that it would spin and whirl away like a tiny rainbow.  He listens to me carefully and writes down the word “peerie”.

We are back on the coach heading towards the ferry for Dunk Island.  All rivers are a seething mast of fast flowing reddish mud – gardens and fields are under water.

Then under heavy skies it is on to a ferry to Dunk Island.  To lessen Danny’s load we only take two small bags with us.  Great drama as we think we have mislaid our toiletries bag and great relief when it is discovered.

The skies clear and sun shines as we travel by catamaran on the twenty-five minute cruise to Dunk Island.  The crossing wasn’t perfect but it is great to reach our destination.  Dunk Island looks idyllic.  It’s a picture postcard island with waving palm trees, tropical vegetation and golden sandy beaches.  Sandy tries to book me in for a day’s fishing tomorrow.  David, one of the men on the trip from Devon, says he will come fishing with me as he doesn’t like the idea of me going out to sea with people I don’t know.  Sandra tells me the fishing boat has been chartered and the charterers will not allow me to join them.  I am disappointed.

We walk along the small pier to the waiting dilapidated minibus.  I feel quite at home as the minibus could well belong on Cape Clear or Sherkin.

When May hears of my disappointment she says, “I hope their boat sinks.  Serves them right!”

I say, “I wouldn’t wish that on them. But I hope they catch nothing.  That’s really selfish two of them chartering a boat that an take eight.”

Dunk Island has had a tremendously high level of rain.  One of the tennis courts is under water and all the tracks are rutted and muddy.

For the moment we feel we have left the tropical downpours behind us and maybe at last we shall have some sunshine, but little warnings are in our room.  We are in a rush as we are booked into 109 Banfield Units and we have to dump our bags and rush back to the main reception for the welcome cocktail.  Dinner is to be served at 7pm so we rush back to our room shower and change quickly.

It is dark as we try to make our way to the main restaurant but we cannot see where we are supposed to go.  The lighting on the paths set within the rain forest is sparse and we can hear live things in the bushes.  We hear Titania calling.  She says, “There’s a torch and umbrella in your room.”  So we return to our unit to search them out.

We hear others of our party calling through the darkness.  Someone calls, “Stay to the centre of the path.  There are animals in the bushes,”

We are terrified but we are hungry and although the light from our torches is dim, we wave it from side to side on the path in front of us.  We laugh and giggle until we reach civilization.

We leave our large umbrella in the stand at reception and are seated with Geoffrey and Brenda, Titania and Alex, the elderly American. It seems hours since we have eaten anything. This meal has been paid for as part of our luxury coach trip and we very quickly realise our portions are small.  When our main course arrives we wait for the vegetables but the two slices of carrot and single slice of courgette  is all that we are given. `We start laughing and joking and Maureen threatens to beg bread rolls from the other tables but everyone else is in the same  boat.

continue is worried as Jimmy is getting angry and impatient with the waitress.  They have given their order six times and she still cannot get it right,  Jimmy in frustration writes it down on a piece of paper for her. To his fury she still gets it wrong.

The girl comes to take our dessert orders and we ask her what would be the biggest portion.  Brenda and Geoffrey continue to crack jokes and we all end up laughing until we are crying.  We are still hungry but we have had a great evening.

Sandy tells me that one of the charterers has backed out and asks if David and I still want to go because now the rate of the charter has almost doubled.

We still agree to go fishing.

”Can’t come all the way to the Barrier Reef and not fish,” says David.

We stay on with the others in the large, open comfortable bar, drinking until a guitarist forces us out.  The volume of his music is so loud it pierces our senses.  The bar is none to clean and only the ladies’ toilet is working.

Our umbrella is missing from the stand but the waitress finds us another one.  We walk through the rain which has come tumbling down again with a vengeance. The three girls from Yorkshire and Danny are drinking outside their room and are in fine voice.

The top surface of the fridge in our room is running alive with ants.  We had left our cups and Maureen’s tube of condensed milk out in our haste to eat earlier on.  We find a spray and ant powder in the bathroom and dispense with them. We wash the cups and saucers in boiling water.

We sit in our porch in our nighties and drink tea and listen to the rain and the lively chatter from Danny and the girls.  They brought a carry out from the last stop before we came on the island and it seems as if it may not last until tomorrow.

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